Aziz, S. A., Olival, K. J., Bumrungsri, S., Richards, G. C., Racey, P. A. (2015) The conflict between Pteropodid bats and fruit growers: Species, legislation and mitigation. In: Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World (eds C. C.

Aziz, S. A., Olival, K. J., Bumrungsri, S., Richards, G. C., Racey, P. A. (2015) The conflict between Pteropodid bats and fruit growers: Species, legislation and mitigation. In: Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World (eds C. C.

Aim: 
Review the literature and current state of the conflict between fruit growers and Pteropodids and describe the wide range of potential mitigation techniques
Type of Study: 
Review paper
Key Results: 
At least 18 Pteropodid fruit bat species feed on 90 fruit species grown for human consumption. Netting is the only demonstrably effective method of peeventing loss of fruit to bats: evidence for effectiveness of decoy crops, deterrents, and biological control is equivocal.
Treatments: 
NA
Response: 
The most effective means of preventing bat damage to crops is the use of fixed nets (that generally prevent entanglement) covering a whole orchard. Netting individual trees, or fruit panicles, using small net bags, is also effective. Management methods that assist netting include pruning to maintain low stature of trees.
Models: 
Qualitative review
Comments: 
NA
Reviewer: 
Pia Lentini
Locations: 
The Mediterranean, Africa and the Indian Ocean, Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia and Papua New Guinea, The Pacific
Response variable : 
Presence/absence of species
Replication: 
NA
Ecosystem: 
Predominantly tropical and subtropical forests, orchards.
Full Reference: 
Aziz, S. A., Olival, K. J., Bumrungsri, S., Richards, G. C., Racey, P. A. (2015) The conflict between Pteropodid bats and fruit growers: Species, legislation and mitigation. In: Bats in the Anthropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World (eds C. C. Voigt & T. Kingston) pp. 377–426, Springer International Publishing.