Eby, P., Lunney, D. (2002) Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus as a threatened species: a context for the debate. In: Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a Threatened Species in New South Wales (eds P. Eby & D. Lunney) pp. 1–15

Eby, P., Lunney, D. (2002) Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus as a threatened species: a context for the debate. In: Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a Threatened Species in New South Wales (eds P. Eby & D. Lunney) pp. 1–15

Aim: 
To provide context for the debate surrounding the listing of the Grey-headed flying-fox as Threatened in NSW, with particular reference to crop damage.
Type of Study: 
Review paper
Key Results: 
Grey-headed Flying-foxes are not rare and interactions between flying-foxes and humans are apparently increasing. It is understandably difficult for some people to accept that the future of a species that seems so abundant and capable of adapting to the presence of humans can be in doubt.The level of conflict that arises at flying-fox camps in NSW is consistently related to the distance between roosting animals and areas of human activity, and the numbers of animals in a camp. This is an issue dogged by lack of rigorous investigation and innovation. The open nature of the population of Grey-headed flying-foxes and the geographic scale at which it functions was a revelation that helps to explain the failure of local culling programs to control numbers.
Treatments: 
NA
Response: 
There is an urgent need to develop new approaches to flying-fox management. Effective methods of on-crop control and conflict resolution at camps are essential to the recovery of Grey-headed Flying-foxes.
Models: 
NA
Comments: 
NA
Reviewer: 
Pia Lentini
Locations: 
New South Wales
Response variable : 
NA
Replication: 
NA
Ecosystem: 
Forests
Full Reference: 
Eby, P., Lunney, D. (2002) Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox Pteropus poliocephalus as a threatened species: a context for the debate. In: Managing the Grey-headed Flying-fox as a Threatened Species in New South Wales (eds P. Eby & D. Lunney) pp. 1–15, Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman NSW.