Fujita, M. S., Tuttle, M. D. (1991) Flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae): Threatened animals of key ecological and economic importance. Conserv. Biol. 5, 455–463.

Fujita, M. S., Tuttle, M. D. (1991) Flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae): Threatened animals of key ecological and economic importance. Conserv. Biol. 5, 455–463.

Aim: 
To document the role of flying foxes in plant propagation.
Type of Study: 
Review paper
Key Results: 
At least 289 plant species rely to varying degrees on large populations of flying foxes for propagation. These plants, in addition to their many ecological contributions, produce some 448 economically valuable products.
Response: 
Poorly targeted, often inappropriate pest control is one of the most important causes of flying-fox decline. Tropical bats frequently time lactation to fruiting peaks and increased hunting at that time would have an exceptionally negative impact on population stability. Despite what appears to be a dramatic decline in many pteropodid species, only four are included on the 1986 IUCN Red List, and the six now thought to be extinct were not even listed as endangered prior to their demise.
Models: 
None
Comments: 
The authors note thoer study was limited by depauperate chiropteran/botanical literature and the limited geographic scope of their interviews relative to the distribution of flyinf-foxes globally
Reviewer: 
Pia Lentini
Locations: 
Asia, Pacific, Africa
Response variable : 
Economic value of bat-plant products
Replication: 
55 vendors interviewed across 17 markets
Ecosystem: 
Forests
Full Reference: 
Fujita, M. S., Tuttle, M. D. (1991) Flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae): Threatened animals of key ecological and economic importance. Conserv. Biol. 5, 455–463.