Roberts, B. J., Catterall, C. P., Eby, P., Kanowski, J. (2012) Latitudinal range shifts in Australian flying-foxes: A re-evaluation. Austral Ecol. 37, 12–22.

Roberts, B. J., Catterall, C. P., Eby, P., Kanowski, J. (2012) Latitudinal range shifts in Australian flying-foxes: A re-evaluation. Austral Ecol. 37, 12–22.

Aim: 
To evaluate the robustness of previously published inferences concerning distributional shifts in Pteropus poliocephalus and Pteropus alecto, and the evidence that global warming has been a driver of these shifts.
Type of Study: 
Correlational
Key Results: 
The results do not support the hypothesis that either species range is shifting in a manner driven by climate change. Pteropus alecto expanded southward at about 100 km/decade, compared with the 10–26 km/decade rate of isotherm change. Neither climate change nor habitat change could provide simple explanations to explain P. alecto’s observed rapid range shift.
Treatments: 
NA
Response: 
Climate change should not be uncritically inferred as a primary driver of species range shifts without careful quantitative analyses. Further research is required to understand the causes of the recent rapid distributional change in P. alecto and the implications for its potential interaction with P. poliocephalus.
Models: 
Spearman-rank correlation
Comments: 
NA
Reviewer: 
Pia Lentini
Locations: 
Eastern Australia
Response variable : 
Latitude of observations
Replication: 
3378 point records
Ecosystem: 
Forests and urban areas
Full Reference: 
Roberts, B. J., Catterall, C. P., Eby, P., Kanowski, J. (2012) Latitudinal range shifts in Australian flying-foxes: A re-evaluation. Austral Ecol. 37, 12–22.